Category Archives: sources for supplies

Shortages of Procion Turquoise MX-G and Blue MX-G


My old cat, Isis, on a bedspread dyed with turquoise MX-G, blue MX-G, and yellow MX-8G.

Last month, Dharma Trading Company sent out an important and alarming email about recent dye shortages:

Yes, it is true. The supply of our most important and most beautiful blues, #23 Cerulean Blue and #25 Turquoise, has become problematic. It is even possible that Cerulean Blue won’t be made anymore, due to a lack of the chemical precursors used to make it. This seems to be a little up in the air, so we are keeping our fingers crossed.

#23 Cerulean Blue
We were able to get a couple of shipments of #23 Cerulean before our manufacturer ran out. Right now, we have enough Cerulean Blue to sell up to 25 lbs per customer, but no more. As we run low, we will have to ration it further.

#25 Turquoise
Right now we are having to limit orders of Turquoise to 2 oz. per customer, and are unable to package any more. What we have in stock is it for now. We have a teeny tiny shipment coming in around 12/11 or so, so we hope to be able to be able to sell 2 and 8 oz jars, one per customer, until we get some more. But, we are assured by several importers that they will get more Turquoise, it is just a matter of when.

Mixes containing these colors are all still in stock, but as they run low,
some may have to be rationed as well.

Rest assured that we are doing everything we can to resource these colors for you as we know how important it is to people’s livelihoods. We will keep you informed when any new information comes to light. Thank you for your patience!

As of this writing, Dharma’s website says,

ATTENTION: there is currently a worldwide shortage of 2 dye colors, #23 Cerulean Blue, and #25 Turquoise. For now, we have Cerulean Blue, so at least temporarily, that gorgeous color is in stock, but we have to limit it, and so cannot allow large orders. Turquoise – we currently now have 2 and 8 oz jars, 1st come, 1st serve, 1 per customer please. We are expecting a super huge shipment of Turquoise around mid January. We will keep you updated as we learn more.

Meanwhile, ProChem’s website says,

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Procion Turquoise MX-G

PLEASE NOTE: MANY BLUES & GREENS CONTAIN TURQUOISE 410 & INTENSE BLUE 406 WHICH HAVE BOTH BEEN ON BACKORDER BY THE MANUFACTURERS OVERSEAS. ONLY LIMITED QUANTITIES ARE AVAILABLE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

ProChemical and Dye currently has both of these dyes in stock, so I’m sure Dharma’s expected big shipment of turquoise will be in stock soon. Whew! Big sigh of relief.

What would we do if these two dyes were to become discontinued altogether? We would have to turn to another class of fiber reactive dyes. There are equally brilliant turquoise and blue dyes available in other types of fiber reactive dyes, though they are a little more expensive than our Procion dyes, and none of them are currently available in the wonderful variety of pre-mixed colors that the Procion dyes are. We won’t have to give up using these glorious colors in our work. This would still be an awful thing to have happen. It would be a tremendous headache for everyone who relies on existing recipes for mixing dye colors. It must be a nightmare for the people who mix colors at Dharma, Prochem, Jacquard, and our other suppliers.

(Please help support this web site. Thank you.)

Paula

Where can we order Vat dyes in Germany?

Name: Karin
Country or region: Germany
Message: Hello and sorry for disturbing, we want to order Vat Dyes and didn’t know where. Can you help us?
Thanks and best regards
Karin

Hi Karen,

Vat dyes are not as difficult to find as Naphthol dyes (yesterday’s question). A good retail source for vat dyes in Europe is Granat Farvekompagniet in Denmark. Look for their page of Granat Kypefarver/Batikfarver.

Vat dyes are widely available in many countries, including countries in Africa in which other classes of dye can be difficult to find. North American dyesellers from which vat dyes can be ordered include Aljo Manufacturing, PRO Chemical & Dye, and Maiwa Handprints. In Australia, Batik Oetoro sells Indanthren Vat dyes. (More information for each of these companies is available on my page, Sources for Dyeing Supplies Around the World.)

Vat dyes are not as suitable for beginners as Fiber Reactive dyes, but they are neither difficult nor dangerous to use, assuming normal safety precautions with safety goggles and gloves. The dyes are usually purchased in an insoluble oxidized form, and must be chemically reduced in order to solubilize them and get them inside the textile fiber; when the fiber is then exposed to air again, the dyes re-oxidize and become insoluble, so that the dye inside the fiber becomes fixed in place.

Vat dyes are particularly interesting for printing on fabric that has been dyed with dischargeable dyes, such as Remazol dyes or most Procion dyes. The same chemicals that are used to solubilize and reduce the vat dye will remove the existing color from the dye on the fabric, allowing the brightness of the vat dye in your design to contrast sharply with the background color. Granat Kypefarver/Batikfarver’s range of Vat dyes has been especially selected for being suitable for illumination dyeing on backgrounds made with Fiber Reactive dye.

Another useful property of Vat dyes is that most of them are less susceptible to fading than other types of dye. Not all Vat dyes are equally light resistant, but many are significantly more light-resistant than Fiber Reactive dyes or Direct dyes.

A specialized category of Vat dyes is light-sensitive pre-reduced Vat dye, which can be used to make single-color photographic prints on fabric. There are two brands of this amazing product available, with slightly different colors. Jacquard Products makes SolarFast light sensitive dyes, in fourteen different colors, and Lumi makes Inkodye, available in nine colors. Unlike sun-printed fabric paints such as Setacolor, the light-sensitive dye does not change the feel of the fabric, and it wears better than fabric paint since the dye penetrates the fiber. Since it is actually visible light that fixes the dye, rather than the heat from the infrared in sunlight as for fabric paints, inkjet transparencies with photographs or drawings can be used to make quite detailed designs.

For more information about Vat dyes and their use, see my page “About Vat Dyes”.

(Please help support this web site. Thank you.)

Paula

looking for Naphthol dyes in Europe

Name: Pascal

Country or region: Switzerland

Message: Hi Paula,

Thank you so much for all those information about dyeing.
Very useful website.
I am looking for Naphthol dyes in Europe but it seems quite difficult to found them. I checked also the links your put on “where to buy dye & supplies” but nobody of them seems to have naphthol. May I ask you from where you get them?

Thank you in advance for any further help or advice!

Best,
Pascal

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Hi Pascal,

I have never seen a retail source for artists and hand dyers to buy Naphthol dyes in Europe or North America. I have wondered whether this is because of their toxicity and ease of absorption through the skin. I believe that Naphthol dyes should be used only in a properly equipped lab, never in a kitchen or the sort of studio in which people bring in their lunch.

You can order Naphthol dyes internationally from Batik Oetoro in Australia. I don’t know if there are any local restrictions on the importation or use of these dyes in Europe. Batik Oetoro does ship internationally. See the Batik Oetoro “Naphtol & Diazo” page. For more information about Naphthol dyes, see my page, About Naphthol dyes.

If you do order these dyes, I would love to hear about your experiences with them.

(Please help support this web site. Thank you.)

Paula